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Mission

Provide leadership, partnership, and education throughout Maine to reduce and prevent substance misuse, commercial tobacco use, and promote well-being across the lifespan.

Outcomes

The following outcomes are targets measured through the Tobacco and Substance Use Prevention program to be achieved by 2021, not as a percent decrease from the current rate. These are the long-term outcomes that help our state become a healthier Maine. The data sources for most of these outcomes* are two of Maine’s surveillance instruments (BRFSS and MIYHS). Tobacco outcomes are in alignment with, but further, the goals set through Healthy Maine 2020. Alcohol, marijuana and prescription drug abuse results are in alignment with the goals set in the Partnership for Success grant maintained by the Substance Abuse Mental Health Services (SAMHS).

Exposure to Secondhand Smoke in the Home
20%
Current Alcohol Use
4%
Current Marijuana Use
2%
Current Prescription Drug Abuse
20%
Current Tobacco Use
12%
Current Alcohol Use 
22%
Current Marijuana Use
18%
Current Prescription Drug Abuse
4%
Current Tobacco Use
14%
(over 18 years)
Current Alcohol Use
32%
(18 - 20 years)
Current Marijuana Use
21%
(18 - 25 years)
Current Prescription Drug Abuse
7%
(18 - 25 years)

Events & Training

6.1.18

Principles of Motivational Interviewing: An Introductory Workshop

This introductory course is designed to help clinicians learn basic MI principles, and then translate that knowledge into practice to help individuals quit smoking. Multiple learning approaches will be used throughout the course, including
6.6.18

Parent Involvement in Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Adolescent Substance Use

This three-hour workshop will introduce essential principles and skills associated with cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for adolescent substance use.  Participants will learn how to conceptualize cases within a CBT framework, plan
6.13.18

Tobacco Intervention: Basic Skills Training

Join other healthcare professionals at this one-day training to learn more about nicotine addiction and how to integrate brief, evidence-based tobacco treatment interventions into current practice. It has been well established that brief