Skip to Main Content

National Suicide Prevention Month

All month, mental health advocates, prevention organizations, survivors, allies, and community members unite to promote suicide prevention awareness.

Learn More

 

Mission

Provide leadership, partnership, and education throughout Maine to reduce and prevent substance misuse, commercial tobacco use, and promote well-being across the lifespan.

Outcomes

The following outcomes are targets measured through the Tobacco and Substance Use Prevention program to be achieved by 2021, not as a percent decrease from the current rate. These are the long-term outcomes that help our state become a healthier Maine. The data sources for most of these outcomes* are two of Maine’s surveillance instruments (BRFSS and MIYHS). Tobacco outcomes are in alignment with, but further, the goals set through Healthy Maine 2020. Alcohol, marijuana and prescription drug abuse results are in alignment with the goals set in the Partnership for Success grant maintained by the Substance Abuse Mental Health Services (SAMHS).

Exposure to Secondhand Smoke in the Home
20%
Current Alcohol Use 
4%
Current Marijuana Use 
3%
Current Prescription Drug Abuse
2%
Current Tobacco Use 
14%
Current Alcohol Use 
22%
Current Marijuana Use 
19%
Current Prescription Drug Abuse
6%
Current Tobacco Use 
14%
(over 18 years)
Current Alcohol Use 
32%
(18 - 20 years)
Current Marijuana Use
21%
(18 - 25 years)
Current Prescription Drug Abuse
7%
(18 - 25 years)

Events & Training

9.24.19

Be Proud! Be Responsible! Facilitator Training

Interested in providing HIV/STI and pregnancy prevention education to youth?  New Beginnings and Maine Family Planning invite youth-serving agencies and alternative high schools to attend this training and deliver a 6-session
9.26.19

8th Annual Let’s Go: National Obesity Conference

Join us to explore the First 1,000 Days - the critical period from preconception to age 2. Learn about the impact of maternal factors on childhood obesity and the role of early childhood factors in promoting healthy weight. Be a part of
9.26.19

Reducing Stigma and Using Harm Reduction When Working with People Who Use Opioids

The words we choose have an impact. How we talk about drug use and people who use drugs is informed by our preconceived notions and internalized biases. When we use words like “clean,” we necessarily imply that the opposite is